Think Twice Before You Put A Friend On At Work

Has anyone ever asked you for a job hookup or to be a reference for them? The request may not seem like a big deal initially, but your answer can put you in an uncomfortable position, particularly professionally, leaving many wondering, what should I do?

On one hand, putting someone else on professionally can actually help your own career, if that person, of course, is a good worker. But if the person isn’t a good fit for the company, you could be putting your own job on the line. HR analyst Laura Handrick of FitSmallBusiness.com has hired friends in the past and said things always worked out well because she was familiar with their professional background. “I knew their work ethic and performance at another (prior) company and I knew they would do a great job,” she told MadameNoire.

But before you get to that point, you have to first decide if you are going to say yes or no to the request. If you say yes, like Handrick, make sure you know your friend’s employment history and quality of work in case you are asked. “Be honest about what you are and are not willing to say to the recruiter. Ask the candidate to refresh your memory about his top accomplishments and contributions if you haven’t worked together in a while,” reported The Harvard Business Review.

Doing your own research and identifying the specific assets your friend will bring to the table is a plus for you as well. “If this is a good fit for both parties, this will be a win-win situation,” career coach Cheryl E. Palmer of Call To Career pointed out. “You will have the satisfaction of helping your friend in a time of need. You could get a referral fee if your company has such a program and your friend is hired. It could boost your image at the company if the person is hired, and the person works out well.”

Has anyone ever asked you for a job hookup or to be a reference for them? The request may not seem like a big deal initially, but your answer can put you in an uncomfortable position, particularly professionally, leaving many wondering, what should I do?

On one hand, putting someone else on professionally can actually help your own career, if that person, of course, is a good worker. But if the person isn’t a good fit for the company, you could be putting your own job on the line. HR analyst Laura Handrick of FitSmallBusiness.com has hired friends in the past and said things always worked out well because she was familiar with their professional background. “I knew their work ethic and performance at another (prior) company and I knew they would do a great job,” she told MadameNoire.

But before you get to that point, you have to first decide if you are going to say yes or no to the request. If you say yes, like Handrick, make sure you know your friend’s employment history and quality of work in case you are asked. “Be honest about what you are and are not willing to say to the recruiter. Ask the candidate to refresh your memory about his top accomplishments and contributions if you haven’t worked together in a while,” reported The Harvard Business Review.

Doing your own research and identifying the specific assets your friend will bring to the table is a plus for you as well. “If this is a good fit for both parties, this will be a win-win situation,” career coach Cheryl E. Palmer of Call To Career pointed out. “You will have the satisfaction of helping your friend in a time of need. You could get a referral fee if your company has such a program and your friend is hired. It could boost your image at the company if the person is hired, and the person works out well.”

If, on the other hand, you say no to the request for help completely, be tactful. Tell your friend you feel uncomfortable referring friends professionally, especially if you’re unsure of your friend’s work habits. “Personally, unless you have worked with the ‘friend’ in a professional capacity in the past, and can vouch for their skills, knowledge, work ethic and good temperament, I would avoid hiring or recommending ‘friends’, as I have seen not only the friendship ruined, but also the business morale as others perceive the new ‘friend’ as a threat,” said Handrick.

|Madamnoire